NeuroAct Communication offers expert guidance to scientific communication.

  • Define a publication strategy: identify objectives, target audience, journals
  • Aid to effective presentation of pharmacological data
  • Experienced scientific writing and editing: research reports, posters, symposia

For more information Contact.
 

 

5-HT1A receptors in mood and anxiety: recent insights into autoreceptor versus heteroreceptor function. (REVIEW)

Garcia-Garcia AL, Newman-Tancredi A, Leonardo ED.
Psychopharmacology (Berl). 2013 Dec 12. [Epub ahead of print]

 

RATIONALE: Serotonin (5-HT) neurotransmission is intimately linked to anxiety and depression and a diverse body of evidence supports the involvement of the main inhibitory serotonergic receptor, the serotonin-1A (5-HT1A) subtype, in both disorders.

OBJECTIVES: In this review, we examine the function of 5-HT1A receptor subpopulations and re-interpret our understanding of their role in mental illness in light of new data, separating both spatial (autoreceptor versus heteroreceptor) and the temporal (developmental versus adult) roles of the endogenous 5-HT1A receptors, emphasizing their distinct actions in mediating anxiety and depression-like behaviors.
RESULTS: It is difficult to unambiguously distinguish the effects of different populations of the 5-HT1A receptors with traditional genetic animal models and pharmacological approaches. However, with the advent of novel genetic systems and subpopulation-selective pharmacological agents, direct evidence for the distinct roles of these populations in governing emotion-related behavior is emerging.
CONCLUSIONS: There is strong and growing evidence for a functional dissociation between auto- and heteroreceptor populations in mediating anxiety and depressive-like behaviors, respectively. Furthermore, while it is well established that 5-HT1A receptors act developmentally to establish normal anxiety-like behaviors, the developmental role of 5-HT1A heteroreceptors is less clear, and the specific mechanisms underlying the developmental role of each subpopulation are likely to be key elements determining mood control in adult subjects.